Weathered School Desk Chair

Weathered School Desk Chair - laughingabi.com

Weathered School Desk Chair - laughingabi.com

Welcome to Furniture Refresh project #2. (Check out my last post if you need a reminder what the Furniture Refresh group is all about.)

This month’s theme is “weathered” and I’m gonna be honest, it’s just not my thing. I’m more of a modern, clean edges kind of gal and that’s usually the style that inspires me when I’m working on a piece.

I was racking my brain trying to think of something to share and remembered a client/shop owner recently asked me to try the Old Fashioned Milk Paint she carries in her store. She provided an old wooden chair and a bag of yellow paint. Her only request was that I create a weathered or distressed finish. Perfect, right? I wish every problem was so easily solved.

Here’s the chair before. It was in good shape but she wanted it to be more bright and playful.

Weathered School Desk Chair - laughingabi.com

The first step with any furniture I work on is to clean, clean, clean it. I use a 50/50 mix of denatured alcohol and water. I apply it with a spray bottle and then “scrub” the piece with a green Scotch-Brite Pad. (A trick from the folks over at General Finishes.) Next comes a light sanding – nothing crazy, just enough to rough up the surface for paint.

With my prep work done I mixed up a small batch of paint and got to work. The first coat was so scary! I had never used powdered milk paint before and it seemed so thin and runny and . . . . non-paint-like. But I pushed on and after a few coats it all came together.

Finally, it was time for the fun part: Sanding!

For me the key to distressing furniture is to sand in the places that would naturally age or wear over time. For example, the top of the chair where hands grab over and over again to pull it away from a desk.

Weathered School Desk Chair - laughingabi.com

Or along the edges and corners where book bags might brush against it day after day.

Weathered School Desk Chair - laughingabi.com

I should mention too that the Old Fashioned Milk Paint I used is designed to chip and peel so it did a lot of the work for me.

Weathered School Desk Chair - laughingabi.com

Last, and most important when using a weathered finish, is to seal the project with a clear top coat. Otherwise the paint will continue to chip and peel. There are lots of options out there but my client asked me to use the Safecoat AcriGlaze she carries in her store. I put on three coats and called it DONE.

Weathered School Desk Chair - laughingabi.com

If you’re a fan of weathered finishes make sure to visit these other “Refreshers” for more ideas and inspiration. Enjoy!


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Spa Inspired Upholstered Parsons Chair

Spa Inspired Upholstered Parsons Chair | laughing abi

(QUICK NOTE: This furniture redo is based on the theme “Inspired By”. Make sure to read my exciting news at the end of the post for more info and more furniture ideas.)

I work as a “creative consultant” for my salon/spa. It sounds fancy – because I totally made up the title for myself – but really just means I get to make cool stuff for their customers and for the salon space. (These hand-painted mugs are a project I’ve done for them.)

Several months ago they asked me to reupholster this chair from their lobby.

Spa Inspired Upholstered Parsons Chair | laughing abi

I don’t know anything about upholstery so of course I said, “yes, I can do that.”

I’m not gonna lie, that chair sat in my basement for a long, long time. I had no idea what to do with it. Every time I googled “how to upholster a parsons chair” I got confused. Every time I went to the fabric store I came home empty-handed.

Then the salon went through an amazing expansion. I could go on and on about it but all that really matters for this story is the slat wall in the new spa lobby. Guys, check this out.

Spa Inspired Upholstered Parsons Chair | laughing abi

Spa Inspired Upholstered Parsons Chair | laughing abi

Spa Inspired Upholstered Parsons Chair | laughing abi

Spa Inspired Upholstered Parsons Chair | laughing abi

Gorgeous, right?  Can you believe one of the owners created it using upcycled fence pieces from her back yard? I can’t get over how much color and texture it adds.

Needless to say, I was inspired. I stormed the fabric store like Kanye during a Taylor Swift acceptance speech and came home with the most perfect material in the exact same color palette. Success! Now on to the upholstery job.

NOTE: This is NOT a tutorial. It’s more of a story about how a first-timer tackled an upholstery project with no clue what she was doing. Also, I should let you know that I went into this with basic sewing skills. I’ve made pillows and curtains and can follow a simple pattern but that’s the extent of it. Enough chatter already. Let’s do this.

Spa Inspired Upholstered Parsons Chair | laughing abi

TIP #1: Take tons and tons of photos BEFORE YOU START AND EVERY SINGLE STEP ALONG THE WAY. I cannot emphasize this enough. You’re getting ready to completely disassemble this piece of furniture and without photos you’ll have no idea how to put it back together. The pics don’t have to make sense to anyone else but you. Just take a lot. Then take more.

With my camera in hand I started “un-upholstering”. Staple by staple I removed the old pleather cover. Then, with it off the chair but still in one piece, I got out my Sharpie and marked things up.

Spa Inspired Upholstered Parsons Chair | laughing abi

TIP #2: Use a Sharpie to mark the old fabric you remove from the chair. I made notes about direction. I scribbled reminders about which side of the seat it came from. I drew arrows that would help me remember where seams connected. I marked anything that I thought might be helpful down the road when I was trying to put the puzzle back together. Again, the notes don’t need to make sense to anyone but you.

Next I “unstitched” all the seams with my seam ripper and voila! — I had the perfect pattern pieces to create my new chair cover. Now it was just a matter of basic cutting, pinning, and sewing like I would with any store-bought pattern.

TIP #3: Consider using scrap fabric (or an inexpensive flat sheet from Wal-Mart in my case) to sew a “test cover” before you start cutting your expensive upholstery fabric. This idea has its advantages and disadvantages. It did help me avoid some costly mistakes but, on the downside, the sheet was so cheap and flimsy that it was frustrating to work with.

(If you follow me on Facebook you already know there was a mishap involving a certain cat and this project. #eightlivesleft)

Spa Inspired Upholstered Parsons Chair | laughing abi

TIP #4: When cutting, add several extra inches of fabric on the edges that will be stapled to the chair frame. This will ensure you have plenty of room for pulling and stapling at the end of the project.

Oddly enough while this stage is where the pieces started coming together and the magic started to happen, there’s really not much to say about it. It was a lot of pin, sew, swear, repeat. Oh, and a lot of referencing the photos I took. They were invaluable when it came to figuring out how the back and seat pieces fit together.

One other thing I want to point out. Those tight curves at the top of the chair back were a beast! Thankfully a little google research revealed that cutting small slits along the curve helps the fabric lay flat and run through your machine without gaps or puckers.

Spa Inspired Upholstered Parsons Chair | laughing abi

Spa Inspired Upholstered Parsons Chair | laughing abi

Here are a couple of links that explain it much better than I can. They offer several solutions but for me a few simple slits or notches was enough to get the job done.

http://sweetbriarsisters.com/blog/sew-opposing-curves/
http://www.craftsy.com/blog/2015/02/sewing-curved-seams/

So with the sewing done it was finally time to put the new cover on and staple it in place. This was by far the easiest part of the whole project. I didn’t follow any specific rules or instructions – just pulled things taunt, made sure everything was smooth and stapled my heart out.

Spa Inspired Upholstered Parsons Chair | laughing abi

Spa Inspired Upholstered Parsons Chair | laughing abi

I couldn’t be happier with how it turned out! It was a challenge but definitely worth it. If you’re thinking about trying something like this don’t be intimidated like I was and let it sit in your basement for months. It’s really just about taking something apart and then putting it back together in reverse order.

Remember the news I mentioned waaaay back at the beginning of this post? Here it is – I’ve been invited to join a new group called Furniture Refresh.

furniture refresh logo 2

Every month we’ll each be sharing a “refreshed” piece of furniture based on a changing theme. All of the projects will be shared across our blogs so it’s the perfect opportunity for you furniture lovers to find some great new ideas. This month’s theme is “Inspired By”. Enjoy!


Mid Century Modern Thrift Store Score

I was all prepared to share a Roadside Redo today – a hanging light fixture on the back porch – but then I walked into the thrift store, innocently looking for a picture frame, and this happened.

Mid Century Modern Thrift Store Score |laughingabi.com

OMG CAN YOU EVEN STAND IT?! $70!!!

Those of you who aren’t fans of Mid-Century Modern or Danish design might be saying, “big whoop.” But I guarantee the MCM lovers out there who scour Craigslist and eBay for beauties like this are dying.

Mid Century Modern Thrift Store Score |laughingabi.com

Confession: I almost didn’t buy it. Not because I didn’t love it but because in some circles I could be classified as a chair hoarder. Seriously, I’ve got one stuffed in every corner of the house and even a few out in the garage. It’s kind of a problem.

So I told myself to walk away.

But I couldn’t. I just couldn’t. Truth is I sat in the store, in the chair (no one else could buy it if my butt was planted in it, right?) for an hour and a half silently arguing with myself. I reached out to every person I could think of via Instagram or FaceBook or Hometalk hoping someone would tell me it was worth a mazillion dollars because hoarding valuable items makes you a collector, right?

Mid Century Modern Thrift Store Score |laughingabi.com

I never did get any concrete figures but in the end it didn’t matter. Eventually I just surrendered to my wild, aching chair desires and brought him home. And later that night when I gently sat him down next to the fireplace it was sooooo good.

Mid Century Modern Thrift Store Score |laughingabi.com

The next day it was time for some leather TLC. Overall everything was in good condition but there were a few spots that looked like they needed conditioning. My go-to product for leather is called Blackrock Leather ‘N’ Rich. I buy it at our local feed store with the horse and tack supplies. If you don’t have a feed store down the road a spell like we do you can get it here.

It was no surprise that the arms were in the worst shape since they get so much wear and tear. Here’s a peek at how well this stuff works.

Mid Century Modern Thrift Store Score |laughingabi.comAnd here’s another shot of the inside of the same arm. It’s harder to see the dryness and scratches but if you look closely you’ll notice a big splotch right above the seat cushion. Looks like maybe somebody spilled something. It’s totally gone in the after pic!

Mid Century Modern Thrift Store Score |laughingabi.com

I still want to treat the wood but I don’t have a go-to product for that yet. I would love to hear any suggestions you guys have. I’m considering the same DIY mixture I used here.

For now though, let’s gaze at some more photos of my new love, shall we?

Mid Century Modern Thrift Store Score |laughingabi.com

Mid Century Modern Thrift Store Score |laughingabi.com

Mid Century Modern Thrift Store Score |laughingabi.com

Mid Century Modern Thrift Store Score |laughingabi.com

Mid Century Modern Thrift Store Score |laughingabi.com
Mid Century Modern Thrift Store Score |laughingabi.com

Sigh. I just love him.

Love. Him.

Before I go here’s a quick look at the new vignette that happened when I started shuffling furniture around.

Mid Century Modern Thrift Store Score |laughingabi.com

Nothing fancy but it holds some of my favorite things so it makes me happy when I see it. Doesn’t get much better than that. (The portrait is our first fur baby, painted by my mother-in-law and the children’s book is my new favorite entitled The Day The Crayons Quit. You should check it out.)

So that’s the story of my new love chair. What’s your most recent thrift store score? Something small and functional? Or black, leather, and comfortable?

Roadside Redo: Little Black Chair All Dressed Up For Spring

Roadside Redo: Little Black Chair All Dressed Up For Spring | laughingabi.com

Yesterday I shared my spring porch decorations and promised to tell you about the roadside redo chair I used. Here she is!

Roadside Redo: Little Black Chair All Dressed Up For Spring | laughingabi.com

Does anyone recognize the before pic? You’ve see my trashy little chair before HERE, holding a bucket of Christmas goodies.

Roadside Redo: Little Black Chair All Dressed Up For Spring | laughingabi.com

I decided since she was playing the lead role this time she deserved some paint. I primed first then put on two coats of black leftover from our DIY window boxes. (NOTE: I got this paint for free during a promotional thing Ace Hardware was running a while back. The problem is they were only giving away flat sheen which is horrible for exterior applications. I plan to go back and buy a quart in semi-gloss soon so I can recoat everything in something more cleanable.)

Next Josh built a new seat out of some scrap cedar we had in the garage.

Roadside Redo: Little Black Chair All Dressed Up For Spring | laughingabi.com

A little more paint.

Roadside Redo: Little Black Chair All Dressed Up For Spring | laughingabi.com

And she was ready for her costume pillow.

This pillow is nothing fancy – just a square stuffed with fluff – but the fabric makes me so happy! I bought it at Jo-Ann’s for 50% off and I’m pretty sure I’ll be going back to get more. To save some fabric and money I decided to take apart an outdoor pillow I already had and use the scraps to put this new one together. The red color was a great match for the back and I was able to reuse the stuffing too. Win-win.

Roadside Redo: Little Black Chair All Dressed Up For Spring | laughingabi.com

Did you notice my fancy ties? Those were Josh’s idea and they’re perfect to hold my masterpiece down during our Chicagoland wind storms. I would love to show you how I made them but I neglected to take any pics. (Sad trombone here.) Maybe next time I’ll remember.

Roadside Redo: Little Black Chair All Dressed Up For Spring | laughingabi.com

Roadside Redo: Little Black Chair All Dressed Up For Spring | laughingabi.com

Roadside Redo: Little Black Chair All Dressed Up For Spring | laughingabi.com

Isn’t she lovely? I’m so happy when I can repurpose something that was on it’s way to the landfill. Have you saved anything lately and turned it into a star?

Easy Spring Porch Decorations

Easy Spring Porch Decorations | laughingabi.com

I’m a little behind this year (just like Mother Nature it seems) but my front porch is finally ready for spring. As usual I kept things simple, opting for a few hot pops of color rather than a big collection of flowers and “stuff”.

I started with the same rug I painted last spring. You can see it’s faded a bit over the winter but other than that it’s in great shape. No holes or snags or frays. I think this summer I may tape the stripes off again and hit it with a can of black spray paint just to give it a face lift.

I used a chair again like last spring but instead of stealing it from the back porch I used a roadside redo this time . More on it’s transformation in another post but for now behold it’s newly-found beauty.

Easy Spring Porch Decorations | laughingabi.com

And that popping pillow? I made it with a bit of outdoor fabric I scored at Jo-Ann’s for 50% off. (I bought a full yard so you’ll probably see it in some other projects soon.) Oh, and thanks to Josh, it will never blow away in the Chicago wind. He had the great idea to add these ties to the back. That’s why I love him.

Easy Spring Porch Decorations | laughingabi.com

The colors in the pillow inspired me to buy these red and yellow flowers from Lowe’s which I transplanted into a pot I use every year.

Easy Spring Porch Decorations | laughingabi.com

Then I finished up this side of the porch with my favorite cement flower pot and a little plant I can never remember the name of. Is it Creeping Jenny or something like that? Anyone? Bueller?

Easy Spring Porch Decorations | laughingabi.com

The other side of the porch has to stay small and simple or people can’t get in the door. So I picked up a big hanging basket, cut off the hanger, and put it on a plant stand. Done.

Easy Spring Porch Decorations | laughingabi.com

And that’s it. No muss, no fuss. Just some bright, cheery color and a place to sit and have a drink. What else do you need for spring?

Easy Spring Porch Decorations | laughingabi.com

Easy Spring Porch Decorations | laughingabi.com

Just as a tease, here’s my next project in the front yard. Can’t wait until it stops raining so I can get started.

Easy Spring Porch Decorations | laughingabi.com

What are you getting ready for spring? Any pops of color or roadside redos?

Loft bed for a little girl’s room

Psst, to see this room update from the beginning, check out these posts:
Phase 1: Decorative storage update for a little girl’s room and no monsters in the closet
Phase 2:A modern tree mural update

Remember this post where I shared a cute way to display a little girl’s stuffed animal collection? Well forget all that. It’s gone. See, the problem with raising creative children is they get these ideas and the next thing you know you’re redoing things that were never even done yet. And yes, I realize I could have just old her “NO” but it was such a goooood idea. It had to be done.

Introducing Baby Girl’s new loft bed.

Loft bed for a little girl's room | laughingabi.com

Loft bed for a little girl's room | laughingabi.com

Loft bed for a little girl's room | laughingabi.com

I know loft beds are nothing new but the genius of this one is it was TOTALLY FREE. We drug the bunk beds down from the attic and put them together without the bottom bunk. The chair is a thrift store treasure that was sitting in the corner of our bedroom, holding piles of laundry. And the little table was her nightstand. $0!!!

Here are some shots of Baby Girl hard at work putting it all together with The Hubs.

Loft bed for a little girl's room | laughingabi.com

Loft bed for a little girl's room | laughingabi.com

As for that Ugly Doll collection, it’s back next to the bed where it belongs – just a little higher.

Loft bed for a little girl's room | laughingabi.com

Loft bed for a little girl's room | laughingabi.com

Loft bed for a little girl's room | laughingabi.com

Some of you may remember that the bed used to be under a recently updated tree mural. Obviously we moved things around to make it all fit. The tree is still there but it looks more like this now.

Loft bed for a little girl's room | laughingabi.com

I’ll admit I’m sad that Baby Girl isn’t sleeping under that tree every night. I designed the whole thing around her bed. But when I see her all snuggled up in that chair, reading a book, I can’t help but smile.

I still have a long list of finishing touches for the loft and the bedroom.

  • Paint dresser knobs
  • Touch up paint on bunks
  • Find something to hang on walls under loft
  • Create some storage solutions under the loft so things aren’t just laying around
  • Cover ugly support boards on loft “ceiling”
  • Paint ladder
  • “Tape” two small IKEA rugs together to make one patch of “grass” under loft
  • Sew curtains to create “walls” under loft

My biggest challenge? To get it all done before Baby Girl gets another great idea.

Have you ever decided to redo a project when you were only halfway done? Did it turn out better than the original idea? Please say yes. I really need to hear a yes.

A tale of two red chairs – Part two

Last week in A tale of two red chairs – Part one I shared how a red leather chair became one of “the things that matter” in my life. Today, Red Chair #2.
red lawn chair 2

RED CHAIR #2

The back story:
My closest friend’s mother died in 2010. It was hard watching her struggle with the loss of a parent but gradually, over time, her life settled into a “new normal” and we resumed our summertime routines together – cooking out, drinking strawberry sangria, and hitting every yard sale we could find. Ironically, one of my prized sale finds was from her yard – an old, powder blue, metal lawn chair. (One person’s trash . . . ) It wasn’t pretty but it reminded me of the chairs that used to sit on my aunt’s porch so I had to have it, rust spots and all. Besides, I knew I could make it shine so I took it home, cleaned it up and got busy covering up the tired old rusty blue with a shiny coat of red.

The story that matters:
A few weeks later my friend asked how I liked the chair.

Me: “I love it. It looks perfect on my back patio.

Her: “Good. I’m glad you’re the one who bought it. It was my mom’s chair and I’ll always remember her sitting on it out in our yard.”

My heart sank. I had no idea. No idea it was her mother’s chair. No idea it was a tangible connection to someone she would never touch again – a connection I had smothered with layers of Krylon glossy red.

I had to tell her. She would know anyway the first time she came over to sip sangria.

“I painted your mom’s chair,” I blurted out. “Red.”

She smiled.

“Red was my mom’s favorite color,” she said quietly.

With those six words my horrible mistake became a tribute – a way to honor her mother’s memory, not erase it. And that red lawn chair became one of the most valuable things I own. Not because it tells my story, but because it tells the story of someone I love, and someone she loves. Turns out “the things that matter” aren’t always about us at all.

I have to confess the chair isn’t looking that pretty these days – my paint job was a little shoddy. Some of the red has flaked off and while I would normally scrape, prime, and repaint those ugly little chips I think I’ll just let the faded, slightly rusty, blue shine through this time.

A tale of two red chairs – Part one

Nate Berkus The Things That MatterMy aunt gave me Nate Berkus’ new book, “The Things That Matter”, as an early Christmas gift. Let me just say, this isn’t your mother’s decorating book. It starts with an intimate look at Nate’s life then invites us into his home, as well as twelve others, to show us how the things we gather in our life’s travels are a part of us – and therefore, should be a part of our homes. They tell a story, our story. In Nate’s words:

“The truth is, things matter. They have to. They’re what we live with and touch each and every day. They represent what we’ve seen, who we’ve loved, and where we hope to go next. They remind us of the good times and the rough patches, and everything in between that’s made us who we are.”

Before I go on let me say that I started reading this book the day after the Sandy Hook Elementary shooting. Like every parent in America, I was in a haze of sadness and anger and sympathy. So it was with this level of raw emotion that I started looking around my own home, thinking about “the things that matter”. One thing immediately stood out, my red leather chair.

RED CHAIR #1

The Things That Matter laughingabi.com

The backstory:
Our house in Colorado Springs was around the corner from a small, uber-expensive furniture store. The kind where I could always browse, but never buy. One afternoon I was floating through the showroom, dreaming of the day I could lounge on one of these plush sofas in a silk robe and kitten-heel slippers, when I spied a red leather chair. The perfect red leather chair. It was slim and modern and . . . red.

Not surprisingly, it was out of my price range. So I visited it frequently, sat in it lovingly, and told myself, “someday.”

Shortly after discovering the PRLC (perfect red leather chair) my husband left for Chicago on a business trip. As he walked out the door I joked, “wouldn’t it be funny if I was sitting here in a red leather chair when you got home?” He laughed.

I bought the PRLC while The Hubs was gone – I’m sure you already figured that out – and I was sitting in it when he got back from Chicago. It was, and still is, every bit as perfect as I dreamed.

The story that matters:
One of the first things I did was call my mom and invite her over to admire my new treasure. She oooooed and awwwwwed like any good mother should and then this odd look washed over her face.

Mom: “Hmmmm.”

Me: “What? Don’t you like it?”

Mom: “I like it. I was just wondering, did you know your grandma has always had a red chair in her living room? Always.”

Me: “Really? No, I had no idea. That’s weird.”

Mom: “And your great grandma had a red chair too. For as long as I can remember, til the day she died.”

It’s important to note that I’ve never really known my grandma. And while I do have some fond memories of my great grandma (Granny), she died when I was 10 years old. I never knew her favorite color, or food, or singer. I certainly didn’t know anything about her furniture. My point is, these women are virtual strangers to me. Is it really possible for them to have such a strong influence on my choices? I don’t have an answer. I just know that what started as a chair was suddenly promoted to heirloom status – like a secret tradition that’s been handed down over generations. It became something that really mattered. And somewhere in the back of my mind I can see Granny curled up in her red chair, draped in a silk robe with one kitten-heel shoe dangling from her toes.

My First Fabric Dye Experience

I want to start by saying if you have never dyed fabric before, start small. Things like scarves or onesies or socks would be perfect. A slipcover for an oversized chair? Not such a good idea for the first-timer. Now, on with the story.

I scored this IKEA chair at a thrift shop for $50. YEA!

My First Fabric Dye Experience | laughingabi.com

Nothing fancy but cheap, and since the whole thing was slipcovered I thought I could do something cool with fabric dye. I’d never dyed anything before but how hard could it be, right? (See where this is going, friends?)

When I got it home I decided I would dye it dark brown and then sew some colorful or patterned covers for the removable cushions. Here’s the disastrous result.

My First Fabric Dye Experience | laughingabi.com

I don’t know if you can tell from the picture but it’s almost purple. Or maroon. Definitely not brown. And see the big stain on the bottom? I knew it was there but thought I washed it out before I dyed it. I was wrong.

So I checked out ritdye.com and found out there’s this stuff called color-remover. Unfortunately, most of the reviews said it only worked using the stove-top method. Which means fitting the whole slipcover in a pot, on top of my stove. Not gonna happen.

Since I had nothing to lose at this point I decided I would use hot, hot water in my bathtub instead of boiling water on my stove-top. This is how it looked after the color-remover. Insert panic here.

My First Fabric Dye Experience | laughingabi.com

Thankfully some more online research revealed that this brown-yellow tint was normal after using the color remover. Phew! So now all I had to to was find the perfect color so I could salvage this project.

After literally days of researching and agonizing and driving my family insane, I decided to go with a tealish-bluey-greenlike color. I created my own custom mix using 75% teal and 25% royal blue. (ritdye.com has a great Color Formula Guide if you’re trying to mix colors. I didn’t use any of their formulas but they did help me make my decision.)

After what seemed like forever in the washer, I opened the door to find a very, very green slip cover. It was 1:00 in the morning and I was pissed so I layed everything out to dry and went to bed. When I woke up I found the most perfect tealish-bluey-greenlike colored slipcover I had ever seen. Apparently my middle-of-the-night dye madness made me forget wet fabric is not necessarily the same color as dry fabric.

My First Fabric Dye Experience | laughingabi.com

My First Fabric Dye Experience | laughingabi.com

My First Fabric Dye Experience | laughingabi.com

The ugly stain is still there but I’m working on a creative solution to that. Also, the pattern on the back cushion is a couple fabric bands I made to dress up some throw pillows. I put them on to see how they looked and decided to keep them there. Poor naked pillows.

Here are some trial & error tips:
1. Start small! (See the first sentence of this post.)
2. Resist the temptation to put your newly dyed slipcover in the dryer. I know you’re in a hurry to see the finished product but shrinkage is BAD.
3. Do your research. Check blogs, google, ritdye.com – anywhere you can find information.

This was a challenging project but I’m really pleased with the way it turned out. Do you have a project you thought would kill you before you finished it? Please share. Misery loves company!